A head start and a glimpse of college, NH’s dual enrollment program looks to expand scope – The Union Leader | Team Cansler

CONCORD — With no one else in her family going to college, Concord High senior Rosima Darjee wasn’t sure if college was for her — or if she’s college material. But college credit for classes she takes in high school through a program called Running Start has convinced her that she wants to continue her education.







Now, Darjee said, she knows more about what to expect from a college course and the benefits of a four-year degree. It also helps get cheap college credit.







In progress Start conversation

Concord High Senior Rosima Darjee, foreground, discusses her college credit grades in a conversation with (from left) Senior Will Richards, Senior Ryder Fiske and Junior Marcus Jordanhazy.










Quick Start - Automotive

Ryan Redman, a senior, works on a tire in an automotive class at the Concord Regional Technical Center. Concord High and the Technical Center participate in Running Start, a program that allows students to enroll in community college classes at their high school.




teacher limited







Care

Sharon Bean teaches a college-level nursing class in the Running Start program at Concord High School.










Quick Start - Automotive

Ryan Redman, a senior, works on a tire in an automotive class at the Concord Regional Technical Center. Concord High and the Technical Center participate in Running Start, a program that allows students to enroll in community college classes at their high school.




Medium achievers







Running start students

Sidrah Khan, a junior at Concord High, talks about her college credit classes with fellow Running Start students Will Richards and Ryder Fisk, both seniors.




Making the Grade is coverage dedicated to education coverage in New Hampshire, with a particular focus on Manchester and the challenges faced by students in the state’s largest school district. It is sponsored by the New Hampshire Solutions Journalism Lab at the Nackey S. Loeb School of Communications and funded by the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, Northeast Delta Dental, the Education Writers Association, and the Institute for Citizens & Scholars.

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