HKU study shows cumulative impact of recurring school suspensions under the new normal of 2020-2022 – EIN News | Team Cansler

Professor Nancy Law, Professor, Academic Unit of Teacher Education and Learning Leadership (TELL), Faculty of Education, HKU, HKSAR

Professor Nancy Law, Professor, Academic Unit of Teacher Education and Learning Leadership (TELL), Faculty of Education, HKU, HKSAR

Co-investigators: Professor Nancy Law, Professor, Academic Unit of Teacher Education and Learning Leadership (TELL), Faculty of Education, HKU, HKSAR (right) and Professor Catherine KK Chan, Academic Unit of SCAPE, Faculty of Education, HKU, HKSAR (Left

HONG KONG, Nov. 22, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The first set of results from the eCitizen Education 360 (2022) project will be released today (November 3, 2022). The project is led by Dr. Cheng Yong Tan, Principal Investigator, and Co-Investigators, Professor Nancy Law and Professor Catherine KK Chan, from the Faculty of Education at Hong Kong University (HKU). The DH Chen Foundation is the growth partner and funder for this project, which aims to provide a comprehensive picture of how students, parents, schools and teachers are adapting to the new normal after multiple waves of school disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The project builds on the 2020 eCitizen Education 360 (2020) and aims to identify the cumulative impact on student learning and well-being outcomes since then.

The data collection took place from July to the beginning of September 2022 at a total of 51 schools (20 primary schools and 31 secondary schools). Over 8,000 students, 3,000 parents, 800 teachers and 200 principals took part in the project.

Compared to 2020, results in 2022 show that (1) elementary and high school students experienced more online learning activities and had more confidence in online learning. However, secondary school students had less positive online learning and wellbeing outcomes than primary school students (e.g., self-efficacy, self-regulatory strategies, experiences of cyberbullying) and were much less likely to seek adult help; (2) parents were most concerned about the impact on their children’s learning due to school suspensions; and they increased their interactions and engagement with their children’s teachers and schools in 2022; In addition, parents of secondary school students were less involved in their children’s learning and had lower parental self-efficacy; and; (3) school leaders and teachers reported more e-learning practices in 2022; were most concerned about the impact of prolonged suspensions on students’ academic standards; and strategies found to provide professional development and other supportive mechanisms to improve e-learning, a collaborative school culture and community support were the most important to help schools meet the challenges of the New Normal.

Based on the above research, the team recommends the following for various stakeholders in the New Normal going forward:

For Students: There is a need to provide support services to improve student learning, cyber wellness and socio-emotional well-being. Particular attention should be paid to supporting secondary school students. There is also a need for further research to examine the cumulative effects of school interruptions on student academic performance.
For Parents: There is a need for parenting services and support, particularly in relation to digital parenting, to support their children’s learning and well-being. Particular attention should be paid to parent education and support for parents of secondary school students as they are less engaged both at home and at school, and the results also show that secondary school students are less well-aligned than primary school students when it comes to digital wellbeing.
For Schools: School strategies to provide online learning and teaching support for students and teachers and to improve communication with parents have yielded positive results. More effort should be made to provide professional learning opportunities and foster a culture of collaboration between teachers for effective online, blended and hybrid teaching and learning to support student-centred learning and well-being. Efforts should also be made to leverage community resources and support for school development.
For affected communities and policy makers: The strategies and efforts of school leaders and teachers to support students in online learning and teaching and to improve communication with parents have produced positive results that should be welcomed and recognized. Support from community partners has been shown to have had a positive impact on schools’ adjustments to the New Normal. These efforts should be continued and strengthened.
dr Esther Ho Yuk-fan, Chair of the Hong Kong Association of Careers Masters and Guidance Masters, believed the data on student well-being was consistent with her observations and hoped the researchers could conduct more in-depth investigations into cyberbullying, particularly in bystander contexts.

Mr. Charles Chan Kin-hung, Executive Director of The Boys’ & Girls’ Clubs Association of Hong Kong, said that cyberbullying and peer relationships are inseparable and deserve wide attention from the community. He stressed the importance of cultivating students’ awareness to stop bullying in the first place and reduce secondary harm. In the meantime, we should encourage viewers to take action to intervene, stop and report cyberbullying incidents. In addition to mastering appropriate individual responses, we must work together at a societal level to create a caring environment of love and respect that has zero tolerance for cyberbullying.

Principal Joanne Lau of LST Leung Kau Kui Elementary School (branch) mentioned that the topical issue of cyberbullying is indeed important. Parents should be educated to distinguish between acts of play and acts of bullying affecting their children. At the same time, the provisions of the “School Health Protection Measures” issued by the Education Bureau (EDB) have the “face-to-back” attitude and teaching arrangement facing one-way, the interactions between students during teaching in the classroom and restricted in extracurricular activities. This could be relaxed more explicitly as these affect the development of students’ communication and cooperation skills.

Principal Fong Chi Heng of HHCKLA Buddhist Elementary School Chan Shi Wan said that three years have passed since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and many outside social welfare organizations, colleges and universities and even some business circles have enthusiastically joined and partners with her school that allows everyone to share and really take resources from society and use them for society. Throughout the pandemic, the EDB has also supported their school in bringing different stakeholders together. Despite the ruthlessness of the pandemic, she hopes students and parents can feel the love and concern in our society during these special times.

project team
chief investigator

dr Cheng Yong Tan, Associate Professor, Academic Unit of Social Contexts and Policy of Education (SCAPE), Faculty of Education, HKU
co-investigator

Professor Nancy Law, Professor, Academic Unit of Teacher Education and Learning Leadership (TELL), Faculty of Education, HKU
Professor Catherine KK Chan, SCAPE Academic Unit, Faculty of Education, HKU
dr Min Lan, Lecturer, College of Education, Zhejiang Normal University
dr Qianqian Pan, research scientist, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University
dr Sisi Tao, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Information Technology in Education (CITE), Faculty of Education, HKU
postdoc

dr Qianru Liang, Postdoctoral Fellow, CITE, Faculty of Education, HKU
project manager

Ms. Sophie Wenhui Li, CITE, Faculty of Education, HKU
scientific Assistant

Ms. Cassie Yimeng Li, CITE, Faculty of Education, HKU
About eCitizen Education 360 (2022): An extension of the Learning and Assessment for Digital Citizenship Project
Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in late 2019, face-to-face classroom teaching has been replaced by long periods of online teaching at home in Hong Kong schools. During this challenging time, many schools, families and students are struggling to cope with this new normal of teaching and learning. Understandably, there are widespread concerns in Hong Kong society that student learning and well-being may have been compromised. It is therefore imperative to take stock of the impact of the New Normal on student learning and well-being.

This project, eCitizen Education 360 (2022), builds on the strengths of the eCitizen Education 360 project (2020), which has produced valuable insights and actionable actions for stakeholders, and is based on the understanding that teaching and learning opportunities and – results during (and after). ) of the fifth wave of school suspensions are continuously influenced by a comprehensive set of factors (or enablers) at the school, teacher, parent and student level. By collecting information on digital learning, student well-being and relevant self-assessment data available in schools, we aim to provide a comprehensive picture of student learning and socio-emotional well-being after multiple waves of school disruption and to various stakeholders, including policy makers , assist in the development of evidence-based action plans that build capacity and resilience to support student learning in the new normal.

For more details on the eCitizen Education 360 (2022) project and report, visit https://www.ecitizen.hk/360. For more details on the eCitizen Education 360 (2020) project, visit https://www.ecitizen.hk/360/e360-2020. Visit http://web.edu.hku.hk/press to view the E version of this press release, download related photos, presentation files and other reference materials.

For media inquiries, please contact Ms. Emily Cheung, Senior Manager (Development and Communication), Faculty of Education, HKU (Tel: 3917 4270 / Email: emchy@hku.hk), or Ms. Sophie Li, Project Manager, eCitizen Education 360 (2022)” Project, Faculty of Education, HKU (Tel: 3917 4759 / Email: dcitizen@hku.hk).

Trinny Choi
The University of Hong Kong
+852 2859 2610
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